Wow saw my description and realized how long it's been since I updated it. I'll just make the bday changes for now and update everything else as I can. LOVES <3 Just a couple of things you really need to know. I'm a girl, turned 21 in June. I'm a green witch (don't know what that is? ask) NOT wiccan, there is a difference. I'm Bi. If any of these things really bother you then you really should not follow me. They are a part of me and I don't hide them. I don't take my cues from TV shows on how to behave. Honestly I hardly watch any TV. I'm to busy living life to bother watching others pretend to. I am me. I speak my mind. When I love, I love with all my heart. I protect my friends and those I love.
As for following back. No, I do not always follow back. If I see something on your blog that catches my eye, chances are I will follow you. Please feel free to ask me to look. Oh an no I don't bite so feel free to leave a message.
 
 
 
 
 

Basic Candied Flowers

  • 1/4 cup egg whites (3 large egg whites), beaten
  • 1/2 cup superfine sugar (or fruit sugar)
  • 2 cups assorted edible flowers (organic)
  • Small paintbrush
  • Tweezers
  • Spoon
  • Bowls
  • Waxed paper
  • Airtight container
  1. Gently wash and dry the flowers. You may separate the individual petals from the stems or cut the whole flower off the stem. Discard the stem and leaves.
  2. Place the sugar in one bowl, the beaten egg whites in another bowl.
  3. Pick up the flower or petal with the tweezers. Using the brush, paint a thin layer of egg white on all surfaces of the flower or petal.
  4. Gently place the blossom in the bowl of sugar. Using the spoon, sprinkle more sugar over the flower to coat it completely.
  5. Using the tweezers, remove the flower from the bowl and place it gently on the waxed paper.
  6. Continue with the rest of the flowers.
  7. Sprinkle the blossoms on the waxed paper with more sugar, if necessary. Allow to dry until hardened, at least eight hours. If you environment is humid, place the flowers on a foil-covered baking sheet instead of waxed paper, and place in a barely warm oven (150 degrees F) with the door cracked open for approximately two hours. The flowers must be completely dry before you pack them carefully between layers of waxed paper in the airtight container.
 
 

Flowers

Although we usually think of herbs when we think of flavorings, flowers can also be used in cooking and baking to provide a wonderfully subtle flavor. You can add whole flowers or petals to your food, but often you want the flavor without the actual plant matter. Syrups, waters, and preserved petals are all handy ways to use floral flavorings.

 
 
 
 
naturalpath:

Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris).
One of my favorite culinary herbs - Thyme is what makes comfort food comforting. Strictly as a culinary herb, it is great in soups, pastas and rubs. Its purple flowers are also great in a garden because they attract bees.
As a medicinal it has a broad range of uses. It has astringent, antiseptic qualities so it’s good used in a tincture (with alcohol or glycerin) as mouthwash to fight colds, or even as a household disinfectant. A tea made from the leaves and flowers can be used as an expectorant and is also supposed to help control blood pressure and work as a calming antispasmodic. If you are trying to sweat out a cold, Thyme can be used in diaphoretic baths.
Thyme gets its name from a Greek word meaning “to fumigate” and was burned in ancient and Medieval times as a healing incense. Traditionally Thyme is thought to invigorate so it was believed to help motivate and start romance, awaken psychic abilities, and cleanse the soul to allow room for new opportunities.

naturalpath:

Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris).

One of my favorite culinary herbs - Thyme is what makes comfort food comforting. Strictly as a culinary herb, it is great in soups, pastas and rubs. Its purple flowers are also great in a garden because they attract bees.

As a medicinal it has a broad range of uses. It has astringent, antiseptic qualities so it’s good used in a tincture (with alcohol or glycerin) as mouthwash to fight colds, or even as a household disinfectant. A tea made from the leaves and flowers can be used as an expectorant and is also supposed to help control blood pressure and work as a calming antispasmodic. If you are trying to sweat out a cold, Thyme can be used in diaphoretic baths.

Thyme gets its name from a Greek word meaning “to fumigate” and was burned in ancient and Medieval times as a healing incense. Traditionally Thyme is thought to invigorate so it was believed to help motivate and start romance, awaken psychic abilities, and cleanse the soul to allow room for new opportunities.

 
 

thisgirlsafreak:

Imbolc is defined as a cross-quater day, midway between Yule and Ostara, celebrated as the beginning of local spring. In Australia this is the 1st of August. But as I celebrate these cross-quater sabbats measured in degrees along the ecliptic as apposed to the half way mark between Solstices and…