Wow saw my description and realized how long it's been since I updated it. I'll just make the bday changes for now and update everything else as I can. LOVES <3 Just a couple of things you really need to know. I'm a girl, turned 21 in June. I'm a green witch (don't know what that is? ask) NOT wiccan, there is a difference. I'm Bi. If any of these things really bother you then you really should not follow me. They are a part of me and I don't hide them. I don't take my cues from TV shows on how to behave. Honestly I hardly watch any TV. I'm to busy living life to bother watching others pretend to. I am me. I speak my mind. When I love, I love with all my heart. I protect my friends and those I love.
As for following back. No, I do not always follow back. If I see something on your blog that catches my eye, chances are I will follow you. Please feel free to ask me to look. Oh an no I don't bite so feel free to leave a message.
 
 
 

Herbal Magickal Correspondences

Herbal Magickal Correspondences

The power behind herb magic is formless, shapeless, eternal. It doesn’t care whether you call on it in the name of a Witch Goddess or the Virgin Mary - or tap it within no religious framework at all. It is always there, present in abundance no matter where we are or where we travel in the universe.
 
 

Love Tea

One teaspoon of the tea blend makes one cup of tea.

For relaxation and celebrating love.

  • One part rose petals
  • One part lavender
  • One part jasmine
  • Pinch of cinnamon (optional)
  1. Blend herbs in a small jar
  2. To brew, pour one cup boiling water over one teaspoon of dry herbal blend.
  3. Steep for five to seven minutes. Strain and drink.

Magical associations: love, happiness, peace, harmony

 
 

Cold Tea

One teaspoon of the tea blend makes one cup of tea.

For the treatment of colds

  • One part ginger
  • One part elder flowers
  • One part yarrow
  1. Mix dry herbs in a small jar.
  2. To brew, pour one cup of boiling water over one teaspoon of the herbal blend.
  3. Steep five to seven minutes. Strain and drink.

Magical associations: energy and healing

 
 

Tonic Tea

Makes approximately 1/4 cup (2ox) of the tea blend. One tablespoon of the tea blend makes 1 1/2 cups of tea. 

For cleansing the blood and toning the digestive system.

  • One tbsp rosemary
  • One tbsp yarrow
  • One tbsp horehound
  • One tsp sage
  • One large catnip leaf
  1. Mix the dry herbs in a small jar.
  2. To brew, pour 1 1/2 cup of boiling water of 1 tablespoon of the herbal mixture and steep for seven to ten minutes.
  3. Strain and drink.

As this tea is bitter, you may want to add a full teaspoon of honey. 

Magical associations: protection and healing.

 
 

Marshmallow Tea

One cup

For the treatment of a sore throat or digestive problems.

  • One tbsp (2/3 oz) dried chopped marshmallow root
  • One cup water
  1. Place marshmallow root in water
  2. Bring to a simmer, and simmer for ten minutes.
  3. Remove from heat and allow to steep for a further ten mintues
  4. Strain and drink

Take as necessary throughout the day.

Magical associations: protection, healing

 
 

Green witches are natural healers who seek to soothe the world around them. Healing is another form of rebalancing energies that have become disturbed. But healing cannot be rushed. Each step must be experienced in fullness and in time. This goes for healing the earth as well as yourself, other individuals, and the community. 

You have to learn from the process so that each step is thoroughly felt, understood, and dompleted. there are two steps to healing:

  • First: cleansing and/or purifying of the negative presence
  • Second: replacing the negative presence with something positive

We usually focus on the first step and forget about the second. nature abhors a vacuum, and what results from the first step is an empty space where the negative energy was and which new energy will rush to fill. The problem is that we do not always control what kind of energy fills that space. To gain control and finish the healing process properly, you can perform a blessing (which asks another entity or spirit to bestow positive energy) or channel positive energy yourself to strengthen the object or person being healed. Be wary, however, of channeling energy that has already been programmed until you know exactly what yoursubject needs. You may think your subject needs strength, but the need may be for something different. Filling the empty space with plain, unprogrammed, positive energy is safer. It allows the body to use it for whatever it requires. 

To better understand the healing aspect of the green witch path, you can research healing deities of various cultures.

 
 
naturalpath:

Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris).
One of my favorite culinary herbs - Thyme is what makes comfort food comforting. Strictly as a culinary herb, it is great in soups, pastas and rubs. Its purple flowers are also great in a garden because they attract bees.
As a medicinal it has a broad range of uses. It has astringent, antiseptic qualities so it’s good used in a tincture (with alcohol or glycerin) as mouthwash to fight colds, or even as a household disinfectant. A tea made from the leaves and flowers can be used as an expectorant and is also supposed to help control blood pressure and work as a calming antispasmodic. If you are trying to sweat out a cold, Thyme can be used in diaphoretic baths.
Thyme gets its name from a Greek word meaning “to fumigate” and was burned in ancient and Medieval times as a healing incense. Traditionally Thyme is thought to invigorate so it was believed to help motivate and start romance, awaken psychic abilities, and cleanse the soul to allow room for new opportunities.

naturalpath:

Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris).

One of my favorite culinary herbs - Thyme is what makes comfort food comforting. Strictly as a culinary herb, it is great in soups, pastas and rubs. Its purple flowers are also great in a garden because they attract bees.

As a medicinal it has a broad range of uses. It has astringent, antiseptic qualities so it’s good used in a tincture (with alcohol or glycerin) as mouthwash to fight colds, or even as a household disinfectant. A tea made from the leaves and flowers can be used as an expectorant and is also supposed to help control blood pressure and work as a calming antispasmodic. If you are trying to sweat out a cold, Thyme can be used in diaphoretic baths.

Thyme gets its name from a Greek word meaning “to fumigate” and was burned in ancient and Medieval times as a healing incense. Traditionally Thyme is thought to invigorate so it was believed to help motivate and start romance, awaken psychic abilities, and cleanse the soul to allow room for new opportunities.

 
 
herbalhealing:

Garlic (Allium sativum)
Garlic is a tremendously powerful herb that most of us have a steady access to. It is always found at the local grocery store and, with the increasing popularity of farmer’s markets, heirloom varieties can often be bought locally, which results in even more medicinal qualities.  Today it is one of the most researched and most used herbs in our kitchens and herbal apothecary. It has a variety of actions, making it a great ally for a variety of health disturbances.
Raw garlic can be taken liberally at the first sign of a cold or flu to ward off the illness or to lessen the symptoms. I like to do this by dipping bread in olive oil with lots of minced garlic!  Raw garlic is an emetic, so it’s a good idea to approach it slowly and back off if nausea occurs.
Herbalist Stephen Buhner reports in his book Herbal Antibiotics that garlic is effective against Staphyloccus aureas, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus spp., Salmonella spp., herpes simplex, and more. He recommends eating the fresh juice for best results. To do this without immediately experiencing its strong emetic qualities, Buhner recommends starting with a 1⁄4 teaspoon in a glass of tomato juice and slowly working up your tolerance.
For fungal infections garlic can be used externally as well as internally.  It is quite strong and could burn sensitive areas, so it can be diluted by soaking it in oil for a 1⁄2 hour to several hours, straining and then applying to the area. An old time folk remedy that works wonders for congestion associated with colds and the flu is to take this same oil, spread it on the feet, cover with a pair of old socks, and then retire to bed for the evening.

herbalhealing:

Garlic (Allium sativum)

Garlic is a tremendously powerful herb that most of us have a steady access to. It is always found at the local grocery store and, with the increasing popularity of farmer’s markets, heirloom varieties can often be bought locally, which results in even more medicinal qualities.  Today it is one of the most researched and most used herbs in our kitchens and herbal apothecary. It has a variety of actions, making it a great ally for a variety of health disturbances.

Raw garlic can be taken liberally at the first sign of a cold or flu to ward off the illness or to lessen the symptoms. I like to do this by dipping bread in olive oil with lots of minced garlic!  Raw garlic is an emetic, so it’s a good idea to approach it slowly and back off if nausea occurs.

Herbalist Stephen Buhner reports in his book Herbal Antibiotics that garlic is effective against Staphyloccus aureas, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus spp., Salmonella spp., herpes simplex, and more. He recommends eating the fresh juice for best results. To do this without immediately experiencing its strong emetic qualities, Buhner recommends starting with a 1⁄4 teaspoon in a glass of tomato juice and slowly working up your tolerance.

For fungal infections garlic can be used externally as well as internally.  It is quite strong and could burn sensitive areas, so it can be diluted by soaking it in oil for a 1⁄2 hour to several hours, straining and then applying to the area. An old time folk remedy that works wonders for congestion associated with colds and the flu is to take this same oil, spread it on the feet, cover with a pair of old socks, and then retire to bed for the evening.

 
 
herbalhealing:

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
Calendula is a wonder herb that produces a beautiful flower that exudes sunshine and joy.  To harvest this highly resinous flower, pick it at its peak on a warm summer day.  When making medicine with calendula, it’s almost always dried first.  Drying calendula for oils decreases the water content, making a more stable oil, and it also concentrates the resins in the plant. When making a tincture of  calendula, a higher-proof alcohol will extract more of the resins.  Calendula will grow readily in your garden, often self-seeding after the first year of planting.  By snipping the flowers regularly, you promote its growth.
Calendula has an affinity to encourage connective tissue to regenerate, therefore it can be made into oils and salves and used for a variety of skin conditions including:
 Rashes
Burns
Scars
Scrapes
Varicose veins
Broken capillaries
Chicken Pox
Fungal infections like athlete’s foot
Internally it can be used to treat swollen lymph glands and soothe ulcers
You can also spread the fresh petals over your salads for added color and beauty
This is a must have herb for any budding herbalist (pun intended).  Shortly I will be posting a how-to for making calendula-infused oils and salves, which are like nature’s Neosporin!  Smooth on some calendula salve and your skin problems will be solved in no time!

herbalhealing:

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula is a wonder herb that produces a beautiful flower that exudes sunshine and joy.  To harvest this highly resinous flower, pick it at its peak on a warm summer day.  When making medicine with calendula, it’s almost always dried first.  Drying calendula for oils decreases the water content, making a more stable oil, and it also concentrates the resins in the plant. When making a tincture of  calendula, a higher-proof alcohol will extract more of the resins.  Calendula will grow readily in your garden, often self-seeding after the first year of planting.  By snipping the flowers regularly, you promote its growth.

Calendula has an affinity to encourage connective tissue to regenerate, therefore it can be made into oils and salves and used for a variety of skin conditions including:

  • Rashes
  • Burns
  • Scars
  • Scrapes
  • Varicose veins
  • Broken capillaries
  • Chicken Pox
  • Fungal infections like athlete’s foot
  • Internally it can be used to treat swollen lymph glands and soothe ulcers
  • You can also spread the fresh petals over your salads for added color and beauty

This is a must have herb for any budding herbalist (pun intended).  Shortly I will be posting a how-to for making calendula-infused oils and salves, which are like nature’s Neosporin!  Smooth on some calendula salve and your skin problems will be solved in no time!