Wow saw my description and realized how long it's been since I updated it. I'll just make the bday changes for now and update everything else as I can. LOVES <3 Just a couple of things you really need to know. I'm a girl, turned 21 in June. I'm a green witch (don't know what that is? ask) NOT wiccan, there is a difference. I'm Bi. If any of these things really bother you then you really should not follow me. They are a part of me and I don't hide them. I don't take my cues from TV shows on how to behave. Honestly I hardly watch any TV. I'm to busy living life to bother watching others pretend to. I am me. I speak my mind. When I love, I love with all my heart. I protect my friends and those I love.
As for following back. No, I do not always follow back. If I see something on your blog that catches my eye, chances are I will follow you. Please feel free to ask me to look. Oh an no I don't bite so feel free to leave a message.
 
 
 

Teas

A tea is a potion that can be consumed. Usually made with water, the basic technique for preparing a tea is by infusion if you’re using leaves or flowers or decoction if you’re using denser herbal material, such as roots, stems, twigs, or bark.

 
 

Life Rituals and Herbal Uses

RITUALS of HOUSE BLESSING

 
 

Simple Herbal Remedies

The following is a listing of simple home remedies for common ailments such as cuts, scrapes, burns, coughs, colds, and so on. Nothing complex will be discussed here, this page is help you become familiar with how to make your methods of delivery. Also it will help acquaint you with some of the more common herbs which are likely to be found in your kitchen, here you will find some simple ways to put them to medicinal use. The remedies found here are for use by ADULTS who are assumed to be in general good health.

 
 

Herbal Dictionary Terms and Definitions

The following is a list of terms you should be very familiar with before attempting to work with herbs. It is very important that you know which of the following terms apply to which herbs before beginning your work.

 
 

dekustick:

Folk Names: European Raspberry, Red Raspberry

Gender: Feminine

Planet: Venus

Element: Water

Powers: Protection, Love

~Magical Uses~ The brambles (branches) of the raspberry are hung up at doors and windows for protection. This is also done when a death has occurred, so that the spirit…

 
 

Plant and Herb Magick

 
 
mothernaturenetwork:

Who knew mint had so many uses?
naturalpath:

Mint
This week we harvested some of the seven kinds of mint we started growing this year. It has been great to learn the subtle and not so subtle differences between chocolate, orange, and apple mint, as well as spearmint, peppermint, sweet mint and mint julip. Medicinally mint has all kinds of great uses - it’s good for colds, repels insects, acts as an astringent in tinctures and a stimulant aromatic. We dried what we harvested so that we will have readily available tea in the winter. In the meantime, I’m sure we’ll have plenty more mint grow back  - it loves Georgia clay and sun. We planted most of ours in a shady area of our yard to control it. Mint is famous for taking over wherever it’s planted.

mothernaturenetwork:

Who knew mint had so many uses?

naturalpath:

Mint

This week we harvested some of the seven kinds of mint we started growing this year. It has been great to learn the subtle and not so subtle differences between chocolate, orange, and apple mint, as well as spearmint, peppermint, sweet mint and mint julip. Medicinally mint has all kinds of great uses - it’s good for colds, repels insects, acts as an astringent in tinctures and a stimulant aromatic. We dried what we harvested so that we will have readily available tea in the winter. In the meantime, I’m sure we’ll have plenty more mint grow back - it loves Georgia clay and sun. We planted most of ours in a shady area of our yard to control it. Mint is famous for taking over wherever it’s planted.

 
 
herbalhealing:

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
Calendula is a wonder herb that produces a beautiful flower that exudes sunshine and joy.  To harvest this highly resinous flower, pick it at its peak on a warm summer day.  When making medicine with calendula, it’s almost always dried first.  Drying calendula for oils decreases the water content, making a more stable oil, and it also concentrates the resins in the plant. When making a tincture of  calendula, a higher-proof alcohol will extract more of the resins.  Calendula will grow readily in your garden, often self-seeding after the first year of planting.  By snipping the flowers regularly, you promote its growth.
Calendula has an affinity to encourage connective tissue to regenerate, therefore it can be made into oils and salves and used for a variety of skin conditions including:
 Rashes
Burns
Scars
Scrapes
Varicose veins
Broken capillaries
Chicken Pox
Fungal infections like athlete’s foot
Internally it can be used to treat swollen lymph glands and soothe ulcers
You can also spread the fresh petals over your salads for added color and beauty
This is a must have herb for any budding herbalist (pun intended).  Shortly I will be posting a how-to for making calendula-infused oils and salves, which are like nature’s Neosporin!  Smooth on some calendula salve and your skin problems will be solved in no time!

herbalhealing:

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula is a wonder herb that produces a beautiful flower that exudes sunshine and joy.  To harvest this highly resinous flower, pick it at its peak on a warm summer day.  When making medicine with calendula, it’s almost always dried first.  Drying calendula for oils decreases the water content, making a more stable oil, and it also concentrates the resins in the plant. When making a tincture of  calendula, a higher-proof alcohol will extract more of the resins.  Calendula will grow readily in your garden, often self-seeding after the first year of planting.  By snipping the flowers regularly, you promote its growth.

Calendula has an affinity to encourage connective tissue to regenerate, therefore it can be made into oils and salves and used for a variety of skin conditions including:

  • Rashes
  • Burns
  • Scars
  • Scrapes
  • Varicose veins
  • Broken capillaries
  • Chicken Pox
  • Fungal infections like athlete’s foot
  • Internally it can be used to treat swollen lymph glands and soothe ulcers
  • You can also spread the fresh petals over your salads for added color and beauty

This is a must have herb for any budding herbalist (pun intended).  Shortly I will be posting a how-to for making calendula-infused oils and salves, which are like nature’s Neosporin!  Smooth on some calendula salve and your skin problems will be solved in no time!

 
 
herbalhealing:

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)
Calendula is a wonder herb that produces a beautiful flower that exudes sunshine and joy.  To harvest this highly resinous flower, pick it at its peak on a warm summer day.  When making medicine with calendula, it’s almost always dried first.  Drying calendula for oils decreases the water content, making a more stable oil, and it also concentrates the resins in the plant. When making a tincture of  calendula, a higher-proof alcohol will extract more of the resins.  Calendula will grow readily in your garden, often self-seeding after the first year of planting.  By snipping the flowers regularly, you promote its growth.
Calendula has an affinity to encourage connective tissue to regenerate, therefore it can be made into oils and salves and used for a variety of skin conditions including:
 Rashes
Burns
Scars
Scrapes
Varicose veins
Broken capillaries
Chicken Pox
Fungal infections like athlete’s foot
Internally it can be used to treat swollen lymph glands and soothe ulcers
You can also spread the fresh petals over your salads for added color and beauty
This is a must have herb for any budding herbalist (pun intended).  Shortly I will be posting a how-to for making calendula-infused oils and salves, which are like nature’s Neosporin!  Smooth on some calendula salve and your skin problems will be solved in no time!

herbalhealing:

Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula is a wonder herb that produces a beautiful flower that exudes sunshine and joy.  To harvest this highly resinous flower, pick it at its peak on a warm summer day.  When making medicine with calendula, it’s almost always dried first.  Drying calendula for oils decreases the water content, making a more stable oil, and it also concentrates the resins in the plant. When making a tincture of  calendula, a higher-proof alcohol will extract more of the resins.  Calendula will grow readily in your garden, often self-seeding after the first year of planting.  By snipping the flowers regularly, you promote its growth.

Calendula has an affinity to encourage connective tissue to regenerate, therefore it can be made into oils and salves and used for a variety of skin conditions including:

  • Rashes
  • Burns
  • Scars
  • Scrapes
  • Varicose veins
  • Broken capillaries
  • Chicken Pox
  • Fungal infections like athlete’s foot
  • Internally it can be used to treat swollen lymph glands and soothe ulcers
  • You can also spread the fresh petals over your salads for added color and beauty

This is a must have herb for any budding herbalist (pun intended).  Shortly I will be posting a how-to for making calendula-infused oils and salves, which are like nature’s Neosporin!  Smooth on some calendula salve and your skin problems will be solved in no time!